Frenchtown: April 29, 1813 – Cecil County

Scott Sheads, a National Park Service Ranger at Fort McHenry and an authority on the Chesapeake in the War of 1812, has created a blog to share stories of Maryland during the War.  His posts are informative and we think our readers will find them of interest.  We’ve clipped part of one on Frenctown here and you may click on the link below to continue to the full piece.

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I have the honor to acquaint you that having yesterday gained information of the Depot of Flour…being with some Military and other Stores situated at a Place called French Town, a considerable distance up the River Elk. Rear Admiral George Cockburn to Admiral John Warren, April 29, 1813.

The first British landing incursion in Maryland occurred at Frenchtown and Elk Landing (Elkton), Cecil County on April 29, 1813. Thirty-six years before in August 1777, three hundred British warships, carrying 15,000 British and German Hessian troops had anchored off Elk Landing, fifteen miles above Frenchtown, then marched north to Philadelphia. That winter while General Washington’s continental army encamped at Valley Forge, the British occupied and entertained themselves in hospitable and warm Philadelphia.

In late April 1813, British warships again sailed up the Chesapeake towards Frenchtown a prosperous commercial port on the Elk River, a mile below Elkton on the upper bay. (Located on Frenchtown Road off Route 213.)

post continues on Maryland in the War of 1812

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