Cecil County Chapter of NAACP Observes 100th Anniversary of the National Civil Rights Organization

The Cecil County branch of the NAACP gathered for its annual banquet Saturday evening in Perryville. The national civil rights organization is observing its 100th anniversary this year and the local chapter will mark 50 years of advocacy in 2012. The evening’s keynote speaker was Major General (retired) Joseph McNeil. On Feb. 1, 1960, General McNeil along with, Ezell Blair Jr., David Richmond and Franklin McCain, protested a segregated lunch counter at a Woolworth department store in Greensboro, N.C., by conducting a sit-in. Their non-violent protest quickly attracted the attention of the national media , which called them the Greensboro Four. Their protest at the lunch counter, which sparked sit-ins across the country, became one of the defining moments for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

Since the local chapter is getting ready to mark its 50th anniversary, I put together a video slide show of images related to African-American history in Cecil County in the 20th century. Many of these images were used in a Power Point slide show during the Saturday evening program.

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4 responses to “Cecil County Chapter of NAACP Observes 100th Anniversary of the National Civil Rights Organization

  1. Think how much has changed in that 100 years. It would have been very interesting to hear the speaker. You know, until recently at least, that lunch counter from Greensboro was prominently exhibited at the Smithsonian.

  2. Thanks David. It was a powerful, inspiring speech. There were a few quotes, I’ll remember for a long time. He said, for example, when he sees our leaders in govt or business stand up today and say how they did it all by themselves, it bothers him greatly. Just look back a short time ago say to the 1960s or even the ’70s and say that it didn’t take a large, collective effort to overcome obstacles that now allows those efforts to advance.

    He also mentioned that as a young person heading south from NY City, how things changed. He didn’t change, but other things sure did.

    By-the-way, this is such an explored aspect of our past right here in Cecil too. There were some lunch counter sit in. The Conowingo Dinner is one example! Someday those are stories to be explored.

  3. Mike I have a request. I would like to obtain the video slide show of images
    related to African-American history in Cecil County in the 20th. century
    which you used in a Power Point slide show presentation and previously
    included in this article. Please advise.

  4. Thanks for the interest Mr. Williams. I’ll be in touch directly by email.

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